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Earth Day 2023: Invest in our planet

4:43 pm, Friday, 21st April 2023 - 11 months ago

Green

Saturday 22 April is Earth Day. From wetlands to woodlands and from rivers to parks, our borough is home to many rich and diverse habitats, and some are internationally important.

For Earth Day we’re celebrating the environment on our doorstep and looking at ways to give back to nature.

We’ll be showcasing the borough’s diverse habitats on social media through the day and we’ve included a roundup below.

Before that, here are some ideas on how you can get involved:

  • Leave a patch in your garden to grow wild
  • Reduce your plastic waste, and recycle what you do use
  • Organise a litter pick

Read more about how the Council is increasing biodiversity and cutting its carbon emissions at www.nelincs.gov.uk/climate-change. Here’s our habitat roundup…

Bradley Woods - photo by Double Red
Bradley Woods – photo by Double Red

Woodland

Bradley Woods is our area’s only ancient woodland. It’s been here for more than 1,000 years. From beetles to bats, many species rely on this unique habitat. It’s taken hundreds of years to create this rare treasure.

The River Freshney - photo by Double Red
The River Freshney – photo by Double Red

Rivers

From amphibians, such as frogs, toads and newts, to birds, mammals, insects and fish, the River Freshney is home to all sorts of wildlife. It’s a unique habitat and one of only 200 chalk streams in the world.

The Fitties Beach - photo by Double Red
The Fitties Beach – photo by Double Red

Coast

Our coast is an internationally important wetland and is vital to one of the largest migrations on the planet. From sand dunes to mud flats, the rich feeding grounds provide a stopover for millions of migrating birds.

Wildflower meadow in Ainslie Street, Grimsby
Wildflower meadow in Ainslie Street, Grimsby

Urban

Parks, gardens and roadside verges can all help bring more nature into our urban environment. Green spaces in built-up areas provide a much-needed haven for plants and wildlife.

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