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Stunning new recycling sculpture set to join Hammy the Haddock in Cleethorpes

2:28 pm, Tuesday, 16th March 2021 - 2 months ago

Bins, waste and recycling

A stunning new recycling sculpture is set to join Hammy the Haddock in helping keep Cleethorpes beach clean and plastic free.

Following the success of Hammy the Haddock, the giant plastic bottle recycling sculpture on Cleethorpes Central Promenade, North East Lincolnshire Council has again teamed up with Grimsby-based Blackrow Engineering and several other sponsors to bring a new feature to the resort.

The new sculpture is a 2-metre-tall stainless-steel globe to be installed on North Promenade.

Like Hammy, it will be a giant recycling bin for plastic bottles.

The globe will also highlight the fascinating array of birds that visit Cleethorpes and show the vital role the resort plays in the international natural phenomenon of bird migration.

Sponsors so far include Dalkia Waste Energy, XceCo Ltd, GLID, Ebb & Flo, myenergi, Grimsby Carpet Warehouse (GCW), Holidays by Design, Tesco Cleethorpes Extra staff, Total Signs & Graphics Ltd, AS Motors Ltd and Alturn Scaffolding.

If you are interested in sponsoring this exciting new sculpture, please contact angela.webster@nelincs.gov.uk.

Gary Pexman, Director at Blackrow Engineering said:

“We are delighted to have been chosen to be involved in the Globe Recycling Sculpture project.

“Especially having been such a huge part of the success of Hammy the Haddock.

“It is crucial that we look after our environment and what a fantastic way to help!

“The Globe will be manufactured by our skilled tradesman, using traditional sheet metal fabrication techniques.

“We will be using a high-grade stainless steel, which will ensure the Sculpture will be around for years to come.”

Cllr Callum Procter, Portfolio Holder for Economic Growth, Housing and Tourism at North East Lincolnshire Council, added:

“Hammy the Haddock was a fantastic new addition to Cleethorpes sea front and I’m excited to see he will now have a friend in the form of a globe.

“I’m grateful to Blackrow Engineering for all the work they are doing to design and make the new sculpture.

“I’d also like to thank all the sponsors who are making this possible.

“The new globe and Hammy serve as a reminder to everyone that we can all play a part in looking after our environment.”

Migrating birds

The Humber Estuary supports internationally important numbers of wetland birds.

For this reason, the Cleethorpes and Grimsby coastline, including the wildlife and physical environment, are protected by UK law.

More than 150,000 wetlands birds rely on the estuary for safe feeding and roosting grounds, especially over the winter and during spring and autumn migrations.

After covering vast distances from places such as the Arctic and South Africa, they arrive in vital need of food and rest. The food provided by the estuary is vital to their survival when they arrive, and to build themselves up for the return journey.

The bird populations are so important, the estuary is designated as a Special Protected Area, Special Area for Conservation, European Marine Site, and is recognised by the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands as a wetland of international importance.

Hammy the Haddock

Pictured with Hammy the Haddock are competition winner Lilly-Mai Halligan, Cllr Callum Procter portfolio holder for Tourism, Heritage and Culture at NELC, and operations director Ben Tiffney , fabricator Logan Marklew and apprentice fabricator Ryan Meggit from Blackrow Engineering.
Pictured with Hammy the Haddock are competition winner Lilly-Mai Halligan, Cllr Callum Procter portfolio holder for Tourism, Heritage and Culture at NELC, and operations director Ben Tiffney , fabricator Logan Marklew and apprentice fabricator Ryan Meggit from Blackrow Engineering.

Hammy the Haddock was installed on Central Promenade, Cleethorpes, in September 2020.

More than 80 children entered a competition to name the new fish sculpture. The winner was Lilly-Mai Halligan, from Grimsby, with her suggestion of ‘Hammy the Haddock’.

Lilly-Mai named the fish after her uncle, Bernard ‘Buster’ Hammond, who died in January. He was a well-known figure in the resort and part of the beach safety team for more than 30 years.

Hammy the Haddock is made entirely from high grade stainless steel. The fish is 4m long, roughly 1.2m wide and 1.7m tall.

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